Interpreting Your District's Scores

In August 2017 your district, charter, or private school may have received a Local Wellness Policy Evaluation Report from the Obesity Prevention Initiative. In this report, we evaluated your district’s wellness policy for language addressing the 2004 and 2010 federal mandates associated with the WIC Reauthorization Act and the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act. We also documented how many best practices your district addressed and required. These best practices go far beyond the federal mandates to address child health and obesity.


 Table showing whether a policy included language that partially or fully addressed the 2004 and 2010 federal mandates, and giving the year of last policy revision for the district's Local Wellness Policy.

Federal Mandates

How to Interpret the Federal Mandate Table

The table to the right reflects the evaluation of Example School District’s local wellness policy regarding the 2004 and 2010 federal mandates. Below is a list of language that was used to determine whether a district had partially or fully addressed each of the individual mandates.

For a mandate to be noted as “Partially or Fully Addressed” your district’s policy must have included language that addressed at least one of the bullet points under each mandate (see below). If we couldn’t find language that met any of these criterion, we marked that mandate as “Not Addressed.”

You’ll also see the year of last revision for your district’s wellness policy. If the policy did not indicate a year of last revision, you will likely see “Not reported in policy.”

Click on each of the Federal Mandates to view assigned policy language.

+ Nutrition Education Includes goals for nutrition education that are designed to promote student wellness in a manner that the local education agency (LEA) determines is appropriate.

  • There is a standards-based nutrition curriculum, healthy education curriculum or other curriculum that includes nutrition.
  • Links nutrition education with the school food environment.
  • Nutrition education teaches skills that are behavior-focused.

+ Nutrition Guidelines Includes nutrition guidelines selected by the LEA for all foods available on each school campus during the school day with the objectives of promoting student health and reducing childhood obesity. Provides an assurance that guidelines for reimbursable school meals shall not be less restrictive than regulations and guidance issued by the Secretary of Agriculture pursuant to subsections (a) and (b) of section 10 of the Child Nutrition Act and sections 9(f)(1) and 17(a)), as those regulations and guidance apply to schools.

  • Addresses compliance with USDA nutrition standards for all foods sold to students during the school day (commonly referred to as Smart Snacks).
  • Addresses compliance with USDA minimum nutrition standards for all beverages sold to students during the school day (commonly referred to as Smart Snacks).
  • Addresses compliance with USDA nutrition standards for reimbursable meals.

+ Physical Activity Includes goals for physical activity that are designed to promote student wellness in a manner that the LEA determines is appropriate.

  • There is a physical education curriculum for all grades.
  • The physical education curriculum is aligned with national and/or state physical education standards.
  • Addresses before and after school physical activity for all students.
  • Addresses physical activity breaks for all students.

+ Evaluation LEAs are required to periodically measure and make available to the public an assessment on the implementation of the local wellness policy, including the extent to which schools are in compliance with the policy, the extent to which the policy compares to the model policy, and a description of the progress made in attaining goals of the policy.

  • Addresses annual assessment of SWP implementation/progress towards wellness goals.
  • Progress report on compliance/implementation is made to the school community (which includes the Board of Education, superintendent, principals, staff, students, and parents).
  • Progress report ensures transparency by including: a) the web address of the wellness policy, b) a description of each school’s activities and progress towards meeting wellness goals, and c) the contact details for committee leadership and information on how to join the committee.

+ Nutrition Promotion Includes goals for nutrition promotion that are designed to promote student wellness in a manner that the LEA determines is appropriate.

  • Encourages staff to model healthy eating/drinking behaviors.
  • Addresses staff not modeling healthy eating/drinking behaviors.
  • Specifies marketing/ways to promote healthy food and beverage choices.
  • Specifies that family wellness activities will be planned to take place at school and will include nutrition and physical activity components.

+ Parent Involvement Involves parents, students, representatives of the school food authority, the school board, school administrators, and the public in the development of the school wellness policy.

  • District wellness committee has community-wide representation.
  • Specifies how district will engage families to provide information and /or solicit input to meet district nutrition/physical activity goals (e.g., through communications to parents, newsletters, website, email, parent meetings, or events).

+ Implementation Establishes a plan for measuring implementation of the local wellness policy, including designation of 1 or more persons within the local educational agency or at each school, as appropriate, charged with operational responsibility for ensuring that the school meets the local wellness policy.

  • Designates a leader in each school accountable for ensuring compliance within the school.

+ Transparency LEAs are required to inform and update the public (including parents, students, and others in the community) about the content and implementation of the local wellness policy.

  • Progress report on compliance/implementation is made to the public.
  • Addresses methods for communication with the public.

Best Practices

How to Interpret the Best Practices Graphs

The graph below reflects the evaluation of Example School District’s local wellness policy regarding 74 best practices to promote child health, categorized into 6 content areas. The best practices are derived from the WellSAT 2.0, which you can view at www.wellsat.org. To view language from Wisconsin districts that addresses each of the best practices, visit our Best Practices page.

 Bar chart displaying Breadth and Strength scores for each content area. Statewide average and district-specific averages are displayed.

Scores in each of the graphs represent the percent of best practices addressed (see Breadth graph) and required (see Strength graph) in a certain content area. You’ll probably notice your district’s Breadth scores are higher than the Strength scores. This is a pattern found statewide. This means that while Wisconsin districts are addressing some of the best practices in each content area, the language in the policy is weak, tentative, or suggestive. To convert your district’s percentage into the number of best practices addressed in each content area, see the table below.

 

How to use the table

For each content area, choose the percentage noted in your district’s Best Practices Graph. Follow the row across to Number of Best Practices Addressed. For example, in the above graphs, Example School District’s wellness policy scored about 30% for Wellness Promotion Breadth. This translates as 5 best practices addressed. The Strength score for Wellness Promotion is 20%. This means that 3 of those best practices are required at the district level.

Scores will vary slightly for districts that serve different grades. Use the table below that matches the grades served by your school district. For help interpreting your scores, e-mail us at wihealthatlas@hslc.wisc.edu.

 

Districts Serving Grades K-12

 Table displaying content area scores and number of best practices addressed for Districts Serving Grades K-12

Districts Serving Grades K-8

 Table displaying the content area scores and corresponding number of best practices addressed for Districts Serving Grades K-8.